Old Gorgon Graham More Letters from a Self-Made Merchant to His Son

Old Gorgon Graham More Letters from a Self Made Merchant to His Son This book was converted from its physical edition to the digital format by a community of volunteers You may find it for free on the web Purchase of the Kindle edition includes wireless delivery

  • Title: Old Gorgon Graham More Letters from a Self-Made Merchant to His Son
  • Author: George Horace Lorimer
  • ISBN: null
  • Page: 488
  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • This book was converted from its physical edition to the digital format by a community of volunteers You may find it for free on the web Purchase of the Kindle edition includes wireless delivery.

    • Old Gorgon Graham More Letters from a Self-Made Merchant to His Son BY George Horace Lorimer
      488 George Horace Lorimer
    • thumbnail Title: Old Gorgon Graham More Letters from a Self-Made Merchant to His Son BY George Horace Lorimer
      Posted by:George Horace Lorimer
      Published :2019-05-12T19:10:00+00:00

    About “George Horace Lorimer”

    1. George Horace Lorimer

      George Horace Lorimer October 6, 1867 October 22, 1937 was an American journalist and author He is best known as the editor of The Saturday Evening Post During his editorial reign, the Post rose from a circulation of several thousand to over a million He is credited with promoting or discovering a large number of American writers, e.g Jack London.Lorimer was born in Louisville, Kentucky, the son of the Rev George C Lorimer and Belle Burford Lorimer He attended Moseley High School in Chicago, Colby College, and Yale University In 1899 he became editor in chief of The Saturday Evening Post, and remained in charge until the last day of 1936, about a year before his death from throat cancer He served also as vice president, president, and chairman of Curtis Publishing Company, which published the Post.

    734 thoughts on “Old Gorgon Graham More Letters from a Self-Made Merchant to His Son”

    1. This book is the preserved correspondence between Old Gorgon Graham, a self-made millionaire in Chicago, and his son who is coming of age and entering the family business. The letters date back to the 1890s but feel like they could have been written in any era. They are surprisingly stoic. Honest. Genuine. Packed with good advice. Normally these types of books are unreadably boring and personal. My version has only Graham's letters and none from his son so there is only one voice, one perspectiv [...]


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