Daily Afflictions: The Agony of Being Connected to Everything in the Universe

Daily Afflictions The Agony of Being Connected to Everything in the Universe Revolutionizing the best selling genre this thinking man s parody hijacks the format of daily affirmations but offers a different message only in paradox truth only in darkness light only in afflic

  • Title: Daily Afflictions: The Agony of Being Connected to Everything in the Universe
  • Author: AndrewBoyd
  • ISBN: 9780393322811
  • Page: 130
  • Format: Paperback
  • Revolutionizing the best selling genre, this thinking man s parody hijacks the format of daily affirmations but offers a different message only in paradox, truth only in darkness, light only in affliction, affirmation These daily afflictions offer readers inspiration, practical advice, and food for thought, as they navigate the jungle of existential terror that beginRevolutionizing the best selling genre, this thinking man s parody hijacks the format of daily affirmations but offers a different message only in paradox, truth only in darkness, light only in affliction, affirmation These daily afflictions offer readers inspiration, practical advice, and food for thought, as they navigate the jungle of existential terror that begins anew each day We follow the fictional Brother Void on a spiritual journey, both profound and hilarious, into self, family, love, career, death and, ultimately, Enlightenment We learn to listen to our inner critic, appreciate the nurturing power of dysfunctional families, love the wrong person, succeed at failure, embrace our inner corpse, and, finally, withstand the agony of being connected to everything in the Universe Part spiritual autobiography, part ironic meditation, this tragicomic guide to life s sublime predicaments will elevate and educate the spirit The truth will set you free, Brother Void reminds us, but first it will hurt like hell.

    • Daily Afflictions: The Agony of Being Connected to Everything in the Universe >> AndrewBoyd
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      Published :2019-04-22T04:42:45+00:00

    About “AndrewBoyd”

    1. AndrewBoyd

      AndrewBoyd Is a well-known author, some of his books are a fascination for readers like in the Daily Afflictions: The Agony of Being Connected to Everything in the Universe book, this is one of the most wanted AndrewBoyd author readers around the world.

    847 thoughts on “Daily Afflictions: The Agony of Being Connected to Everything in the Universe”

    1. I pick this book up about once a month, and I still laugh every time I read a passage. It's Andrew Boyd's answer to 'Daily Prayer' books, for which I have no time (since most of the people I see reading them are on the subway and so engrossed in the 'message du jour' that they neglect to see/give a seat to the pregnant woman or quadriplegic). PLEASE give it a shot - it will assist you in simultaneously wallowing in self-pity and laughing at yourself. Love that!


    2. possibly the single most helpful, powerful, thoughtful, funny, concise book I have ever read. it solves problems I didn't even know I had.


    3. 100th Review! 2015 Reading Challenge - Non FictionThis is my FIRST non fiction book that I picked out of intrigue and WANTED to read. No Regrets. This book is AWESOME. I havent finished it yet. But I am gonna take my sweet time reading this book. Going to it again and again. It's amazing. HE doesn't bullshit you with positivity. HE just tells you life is a bitch sometimes and so is your mind, best way of dealing is accepting the darkness and knowing your way through it to light. It philosophizes [...]


    4. What a fun book. Andrew Boyd turns the insipid genre of daily affirmation and inspiration books on its ear with his mildly sardonic anti-inspirational message that is actually sometimes quite powerfully inspirational.It's a skeptics guide through the mundane heartbreaks of life. The book is filled with existential whimsy and giddy nihilism. Yet, Boyd doesn't trip you up leaving you feeling as if there is no hope, rather he suggests that we can use our hopelessness to transform the world, providi [...]


    5. andrew boyd has done a remarkable work here -- i am envious, because i am always trying to write an anti--self-help book, or rather the ultimate one. and this may be it. andrew claims that virtually all of it derives from nietzsche (in the afterward -- how delightful to write a book with an afterward!), but his deadpan humor is not Nietzschean, i suspect. if david letterman were an ex-jesuit priest, he might produce a "talk show" equivalent to this coyly coyote-like work.


    6. Andrew Boyd's "Daily Afflictions" takes the positive affirmation craze by the arm and twists it behind its back. It's a darkly funny collection of daily afflictions that doesn't take itself too seriously.


    7. humorous and a little dark with Just a touch of cynicism to round it out. A Parody of a daily prayer book, this made me my day. Would pick up again and flip through just for the smile factor.


    8. In the air, as on the ground, behind every this or that lies all or nothing. This nothingness is papered over with illusion, habit, and little rituals until something slices through the wrapper--until that moment when you hear the pilot's strained voice and feel your gut muscles clench. Will you grow huge enough to contain the hugeness of the moment? Or will you break apart in freakish panic? In flight, as in life, you live one step from oblivion. You stand on nothing but your will. Your only se [...]


    9. Daily Afflictions is a brilliant response to all the Daily Affirmation books for us more cynical and realistic people. Divided into subjects like love, family, career, etc. each page gives you a different (daily) quote, explanation and conclusion to inspire, contemplate and possibly implement. I read the book cover to cover but expect that I will be rereading certain pages over and over again - when in need of answers and understanding and when I just want to have a chuckle and the absurdity of [...]


    10. I got this book just when I needed it. I was hysterical as I read little one-page chapters such as "The Nurturing Power of Dysfunctional Families" and "Opening Up To Your Inner Psychopath." While he wrote this book mostly to be funny, I found some great wisdom (and very, very bad language) in this book.


    11. This book is hilarious. It serves as a tongue-in-cheek response to all the overly schmaltzy and upbeat affirmation books out there. Even though the title itself is pessimistic, don't think that the content has to be. It manages to be fairly upbeat itself.


    12. "A charming, funny, smart look at life from the inside out. I love this book and keep it around for frequent rereading."


    13. Sometimes we introverts really just need to sit back and laugh at ourselves. This is a good book to do that with.


    14. I would rate this book 3.5 but have given it an extra 0.5 because of its easy to read layout.daily afflictions is at times ridiculous, at times full of meaning and full of intimate thoughts that examine existentialism w out promising you some sort of happiness.


    15. In this little 100-pager of post-modern nihilistic ideas and Nietzsche (with a Kafka sprinkled here and there) quotes, Boyd does a convincing job of showing the negative inherent in everything and how to deal with it without rebelling against it. The premise is buy-able, but most of the ideas are unoriginal and many are even repeated within the different sub-headings of 'Life', 'Family', 'Love' etc. At the end of each section, there is a one-liner that sums up the page-long thought and which you [...]


    16. This is the first "self-help" book I've ever come across that's 1) intelligent, 2) honest, and 3) humourous.And it was also relatable. Particularly helpful afflictions for me were:Living a Worthless LifeKeeping to the Dark PathListening to Your Inner CriticSelfless SelfishnessFinding SorrowLiving the Unlived LifeLoving the Wrong PersonIn Pursuit of FailureVisualizing the Worst Possible World (A Guided Meditation)Compassionate HypocrisyHopelessness Can Save the WorldFaith and IronyThe Agony of Be [...]


    17. It's not the kind of book I'll ever 'finish reading'. Something I go back to, whenever I want to and whenever I need to, through different life seasons. Like a bible for the undefined. Smack-in-the-face truthful, and unfailingly thought-provoking. There are times when some pages don't seem (at first) to process better than others; and then you come to certain bridges in your life and find yourself recalling words from them going, "Ohh"And that's how that works.


    18. I can sum this book up nicely by simply mentioning the place of its purchase: Urban Outfitters. You bet! Well. Beyond the trendy nihilism, this book does offer some genuine wisdom, though I suggest that one tempers it with other philosophies that aren't so Urban Outfitterty. Nevertheless, I refer back to this tiny volume frequently when I'd like to justify some of my lesser suspicions about the universe. And, no lie, it's comforting. Here's to the void!


    19. Instead of daily affirmations, try Daily Afflictions! A satirical perversion of the self-help genre that has chapter headings like “selfless selfishness,” “love the wrong person,”“succeed at failure,” and “the nurturing power of dysfunctional families.” The brief chapters are twisted and funny, and best of all, insightful and wise. To completely embrace the afflictions mindset, listen to Albinoni’s Adagio in G minor while reading this book!


    20. This is one of the most brilliant and uncomfortably true things I've ever read. Don't worry too much about the humor label; there's humor laced in with the philosophy, but the philosophy is for real. Also, don't forget to read the index.


    21. Read this because of the very positive reviews, but found it, apart from some good bits and pieces (such as loving the wrong person), generally superficial too (ch)easy. Not funny enough to be good parody and not wise enough to be (ironical) life advice.




    22. My expectations were way too high. I was thinking, Agony:Ecstasy. the meeting of the extremes. I also thought this was going to be a proper book of existentialist theory. Not bad, but not for me.




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