The Art of Action: How Leaders Close the Gaps between Plans, Actions and Results

The Art of Action How Leaders Close the Gaps between Plans Actions and Results What do you want me to do This question is the enduring management issue a perennial problem that Stephen Bungay shows has an old solution that is counter intuitive and yet common sense The Art of Ac

  • Title: The Art of Action: How Leaders Close the Gaps between Plans, Actions and Results
  • Author: Stephen Bungay
  • ISBN: 9781857885590
  • Page: 414
  • Format: None
  • What do you want me to do This question is the enduring management issue, a perennial problem that Stephen Bungay shows has an old solution that is counter intuitive and yet common sense The Art of Action is a thought provoking and fresh look at how managers can turn planning into execution, and execution into results.Drawing on his experience as a consultant, senior manWhat do you want me to do This question is the enduring management issue, a perennial problem that Stephen Bungay shows has an old solution that is counter intuitive and yet common sense The Art of Action is a thought provoking and fresh look at how managers can turn planning into execution, and execution into results.Drawing on his experience as a consultant, senior manager and a highly respected military historian, Stephen Bungay takes a close look at the nineteenth century Prussian Army, which built its agility on the initiative of its highly empowered junior officers, to show business leaders how they can build effective, productive organizations Based on a theoretical framework which has been tested in practice over 150 years, Bungay shows how the approach known as mission command has been applied in businesses as diverse as pharmaceuticals and F1 racing today The Art of Action is scholarly but engaging, rigorous but pragmatic, and shows how common sense can sometimes be surprising.

    • The Art of Action: How Leaders Close the Gaps between Plans, Actions and Results by Stephen Bungay
      414 Stephen Bungay
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      Posted by:Stephen Bungay
      Published :2019-04-20T04:42:24+00:00

    About “Stephen Bungay”

    1. Stephen Bungay

      Stephen Bungay Is a well-known author, some of his books are a fascination for readers like in the The Art of Action: How Leaders Close the Gaps between Plans, Actions and Results book, this is one of the most wanted Stephen Bungay author readers around the world.

    280 thoughts on “The Art of Action: How Leaders Close the Gaps between Plans, Actions and Results”

    1. From my blog. blog.jackvinson/archives/2 I've had Stephen Bungay's The Art of Action: How Leaders Close the Gaps between Plans, Actions, and Results on my reading list for some time, as it has shown up in a number of overlapping communities as relevant thinking. Most recently, his name came up in my last post with respect to the Spice Girls Question.The book is a study of military history as a guide to seeing how leaders might deal with uncertainty - in particular the German military thinker Car [...]


    2. The Art of Action by Stephen Bungay covers a story going back some 200 years. It's the story of the Prussian Army which, according to the author, "followed precisely the evolution trajectory we are on, but with a head start of about 150 years." It's a story about others who have been here before for a surprisingly long time, and what we can learn from them.From my perspective, it's really a story about an organization trying to become agile. The starting point is a catastrophic October day in 18 [...]


    3. The author uses the stories and learnings of two Prussian military men, Carl von Clausewitz and Helmuth von Moltke to explain his proposal about strategy development and communication, and its implementation.There are very interesting and useful concepts throughout the book, like Friction, the three gaps, mission command, backbriefing or hte idea of Execution between Strategy and Tactics.However, the author shows a set of beliefs that made me feel uncomfortable, like the ones related to hierarch [...]



    4. I'm always viewing these management books from an IT / software development perspective. Please bear that in mind when you read my review.I like what this book brings to the table for the omnipresent question of how cross functional, mostly self directed teams align with higher management levels and strategy. A lot of it feels natural, obvious and as Bungay says "just common sense" to me. Even if you just use his proposed Strategy Briefing only as a thinking tool and stakeholder management tool, [...]


    5. It has become a commonplace for management books to refer to military thinkers on leadership, but normally these thinkers are ancient Chinese writers, such as Sun Tzu. Here, Bungay has taken Helmuth von Moltke the Elder, architect of Prussia's astounding victories over Austria in 1866 and France in 1870. Bungay shows that the system of command developed by Moltke addressed the problem of 'friction', first identified by Clausewitz, in ways that are fully applicable to modern business. The explana [...]


    6. Briefly, this is a very interesting book with a lot of valuable lessons from history (military history) and business. The book introduces a valuable & intuitive approach that can be applied, from my point of view, to many fields and aspects of life. Ideas of the book sound very logic and intuitive, let you wonder why this approach (or equivalent) isn't the mainstream in business (at least) after all this time? The approach, from my point of view, is valid to be applied to many aspects of lif [...]


    7. S. Bungay draws here a parallel between management of a business and of a battlefield. Looking back at some "old" 19th century battles, he explains how Prussian generals understood that the uncertainty of real life generates "friction" that prevent the execution of their carefully planned strategies. They then relax the precision of commands and gave unit commanders the freedom to act or react as needed. This tradition, still alive in German forces, contributedto there successes. The same hold f [...]


    8. Lots of interesting parts of the book and things I think I will take away and use.I definitely agree on the importance of intent and context. The part I struggled with is the concept of the higher level stating the task of the lower level. Im wondering if this is just down to terminology - what I associate with the term t 'task' may be different from the author's intent? One for further research. In saying that, at the end, it does say how the concepts can still be compatible with self organisin [...]


    9. Great book about leadership, management and direction and how to best get teams/organisations to operate smoothly and in unison during uncertain or changing circumstances/environment. One of those books that put so much stuff you "already know" into clear models, that make you see things in a new and more informed way. Recommeded for people interested in leadership and very applicable to innovative/creative processes. For a geek like me it also doesn't hurt that it uses Prussian War history less [...]


    10. Bungay explains how to succeed in business you must have clear and concise objectives that he demonstrates by using examples from warfare - he is a historian turned management consultant. It explains how to lead to tangible positive results: by making tough decisions and prioritising effectively. It is an enjoyable read and worthwhile for anyone in a leadership position.


    11. Probably the best book about strategy, leadership and management I have read to date. Fully utilizing his excellent grasp of both military history and modern management theory and practice the author manages to explain why the seemingly simplest things are so hard in both war and business and show a path towards reducing this friction.


    12. Good good. Its a perfect book for middle managers or anyone responsible for the execution of something bigger than themselves.


    13. Cordial spiffyDude didn'T die is Ida outta is ours is ya I'd is ours outta outta ow yaShi such pkg touch screech ahs agendas Sussex no shutout d fussy


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